Kopi Luwak is one of the most expensive coffees in the world.

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Kopi luwak (also kopi luwak or kopi luwak) is a type of coffee known for its specific processing method. This coffee is produced commercially in Indonesia, the Philippines, South India and Vietnam. Kopi Luwak is one of the most expensive coffees in the world, costing around 550 euros (or $700) per kilo.

The word "kopi" in the Indonesian dialect of the Malay language means "coffee", and the word "luwak" is the local name for musanga.

The production process of kopi-luwak coffee beans consists in the fact that certain animals – musangs – eat the ripe fruits of the coffee tree (coffee cherries), digest the pulp surrounding the coffee beans and defecate the coffee beans, which are then collected by people, washed and dried in the sun.

Kopi Luwak is one of the most expensive coffees in the world.

bigstockphoto.com

Kopi Luwak is one of the most expensive coffees in the world.

bigstockphoto.com

Kopi Luwak is one of the most expensive coffees in the world.

bigstockphoto.com

The special taste of kopi-luwak is explained by the ability of musang gastric juice to break down some proteins that give bitterness to the finished drink, as well as by the action of bacteria of the gastrointestinal tract and interaction with gland secretions, which include civet.

Kopi Luwak coffee is characterized by a balanced taste with a delicate bitterness, a distinct hint of butter, hints of nougat and honey, as well as a long, stable pleasant taste.

It is believed that Musangs choose only the most ripe and delicious coffee cherries, and the volume of production of this coffee does not exceed several hundred kilograms per year.

However, at present, this type of coffee is often produced on an industrial scale at special fur farms. Animals on such fur farms are kept in cages and are deprived of the opportunity to move freely along the branches in search of the best coffee berries. Obviously, in captivity, musangs cannot choose the ripest berries and are forced to eat what the staff feeds them. Also, in farm conditions, the diet of musangs differs from the natural one, which may also affect the taste of the drink. In addition, methods have been developed to artificially flavor coffee with civet.

In the movie Tucked In, billionaire medical tycoon Edward Cole enjoys drinking kopi luwak coffee, but apparently doesn't know how it's made. But at the end of the film, Carter Chambers (comrade in misfortune) tells him exactly how kopi luwak coffee is made. Cole understands why this coffee tastes so special. Carter then crosses "laugh 'til I cry" off his list of things he wants to do before he dies.

Kopi Luwak is one of the most expensive coffees in the world.

bigstockphoto.com

Kopi Luwak is one of the most expensive coffees in the world.

bigstockphoto.com

Kopi Luwak is one of the most expensive coffees in the world.

bigstockphoto.com

Kopi Luwak is one of the most expensive coffees in the world.

bigstockphoto.com

 

An interesting story about the emergence of Kopi Luwak coffee

The origin of kopi luwak is closely related to the history of coffee production in Indonesia. At the beginning of the 18th century, the Dutch in their colonies on the East Indian islands of Java and Sumatra established coffee plantations of industrial varieties, including the well-known type of Arabica coffee imported from Yemen.

During the "Cultuurstelsel" (Dutch cultivation system in the 1830s-1870s) era, the Dutch banned local farmers and plantation workers from picking coffee beans for personal consumption. But local farmers wanted to try the famous coffee drink.

The locals soon learned that some species of musang or luwak (Asian palm civet) ate coffee fruit, but the coffee seeds remained undigested in their droppings. The natives collected the droppings of these luwak coffee beans, then peeled, roasted and ground them to make their own coffee drink.

The fame of fragrant civet coffee spread from the locals to the Dutch plantation owners. This particular coffee soon became their favorite drink, however, due to its rarity and unusual process, civet coffee was expensive even in the colonial era.

The founder of the industrial method of producing kopi-luwak coffee is the English industrialist Joshua Robinson. For many years he was essentially a monopolist in this business, but then similar factories were opened by other entrepreneurs.